Product images. If you think images don't play a role, think again. When many consumers search for products in the search engines, not only are they looking at the "Web" results, but they're also looking at the "images" results. If you have quality images of that product on your site -- and the files' names contain relevant keywords -- these images will rank well in search engines. This avenue will drive a lot of traffic to your site, as potential customers will click on that image to find your store.

Holy Engagement! This was an awesome post, full of great info… and then I realized that 3/4 of the actual page was comments… which is even better for shares, SEO and overall engagement. I was lucky enough to attend an event where Neil Patel was giving some great blogging training and a lot of what you covered was there. https://www.thatbloggingthing.com/69-blogging-secrets-i-stole-from-neil-patel/ The simple fact that you comment back is awesome.
If you are using Responsive Web Design, use meta name="viewport" tag to tell the browser how to adjust the content. If you use Dynamic Serving, use the Vary HTTP header to signal your changes depending on the user-agent. If you are using separate URLs, signal the relationship between two URLs by tag with rel="canonical" and rel="alternate" elements.

Use your keyword list to determine how many different pillar pages you should create. Ultimately, the number of topics for which you create pillar pages should coincide with how many different products, offerings, and locations your business has. This will make it much easier for your prospects and customers to find you in search engines no matter what keywords they use.
You’re spot on, thanks again for sharing these terrific hacks. I remember you said on a video or post that you don’t write every time. Right that why you always deliver such valuable stuff. I have to tell you Backlinko is one of my favorite resources out of 3. I’ve just uncover SeedKeywords and Flippa. As LSI became more crucial SeedKeywords seems to be a tool to be considered.
Stickers are essentially mini-posters, and advertisers have been using them for decades to get the word out without technically breaking the law. They hand them out to teams who then go out and plaster them over public buildings, bus stops and street signs. When the authorities complain, they say “oh, we only gave them to our customers. We have no control over where they put them.”
Excellent post Brian. I think the point about writing content that appeals to influencers in spot on. Could you recommend some good, manual strategies through which I can spot influencers in boring niches *B2B* where influencers are not really talking much online? Is it a good idea to rely on newspaper articles to a feel for what a particular industry is talking about? Would love to hear your thoughts on that.
×